Reviewing Personal Footage Without Bumming Yourself Out

Practice footage of yourself is kinda like an oncoming jammer. You can pretend it doesn't exist, but facing it head on can make you a better athlete.

Practice footage of yourself is kinda like an oncoming jammer. You can pretend it doesn't exist, but facing it head on can make you a better athlete.

I’m my own worst critic, and if I don’t pull off what I think I wanted to do in my head, then I won’t be a happy girl.
— Amy Winehouse

I recently had a leaguemate ask how to review footage of oneself without getting bummed out focusing on the things they SHOULD HAVE done. We have all been there. On one hand, it is good to know things you should work on! On the other, you also need to be able to use that review as a time to celebrate your victories, no matter how small.

Here are some tips that my leaguemates and I have found to be helpful when reviewing footage of ourselves:

  • The first time you review the footage, try and review it with a close derby friend. You will spend most of that time cheering for each other and pointing out what cool things happened. Your friends will likely find things to celebrate when you are struggling to see them. Enjoy watching the footage without being too critical. Try to laugh when something goes wrong, if you can.
     
  • Pay attention to the circumstances when things go your way, and also when things don't go your way. Were you jamming against your league's charter team? Were you one of two blockers on the track trying to slow the bleeding? Was there some great offense happening for you? Don't chalk your performance up to these situations completely, but do not let them go unnoticed.
  • Watch the footage in slow motion. One of the most amazing tools on YouTube is being able to watch a video at .5 speed or even .25 speed. You can pick apart what went wrong or what was the cause of your success. This is extremely helpful when looking to break down and recreate a scenario! 
     
  • Take notes! Write down the timestamp of something that went great. Revisit it later to remind yourself that you did something wonderful! Studies have shown it is incredibly important to have a mental highlight reel. If you have footage at your disposal to review, then you can have an actual highlight reel to pull up when you need a boost.
  • GIFs are your best friend! Use giphy.com or makeagif.com as a learning tool. Cut up clips of yourself, or those who inspire you. This way you can watch one movement again and again and again... 
     
  • Ask for a friend to review footage of you in exchange for reviewing footage of them! It's SO helpful to have an outsider's perspective, and even better from someone who has no feelings attached to the event. 

In summary, take everything with a grain of salt. Ask for your friends' help. Take notes. Use all the tools at your disposal. Reviewing footage is something that can really help a skater's growth, and if you have the opportunity, seize it! 

If you do not have footage to review, record drills when you can! Set up your phone and hit record during practice. Ask your friends to record you and offer to return the favor. If you are learning something new or trying to fix a habit, being able to SEE it immediately after DOING it is incredibly useful.

Happy viewing!

I am Slamuel L. Jackson. I'm 3/4 jammer and 1/4 blocker for the Brawlstars as well as A2D2's meme master. I like animals, coffee, and bingeing Netflix.

Posted on March 30, 2017 .